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How to become a Virtual Assistant

Virtual Assistants (or VAs) can provide all the services that an office assistant can, from clerical work to marketing, web design, and book work, but work remotely instead of on-site. VAs are particularly in demand from online businesses, entrepreneurs, and smaller or mid-size businesses who may not want or have space for the support on-site – but there is really no limit to who you could end up working for.

If you’re motivated and resourceful, want a job with lots of flexibility, and are happy to get your work done in your pyjamas, this could be a dream career for you.

If you have these skills, you could make a great Virtual Assistant

  • Excellent communication and IT skills
  • Reliable, accountable, and trustworthy
  • Able to multitask effectively and work well under pressure without supervision
  • A confident ideas person and great problem solver

What tasks can I expect to do?

Roles vary depending on your employer’s needs, but duties could include:

  • Carrying out basic administrative jobs, such as responding to emails, scheduling meetings, booking travel and accommodation, organising calendars, or minuting meetings
  • Preparing spreadsheets, keeping accurate online records, or creating presentations
  • Performing market research, building databases, or helping with recruitment
  • Managing and updating social media accounts, scheduling content, or providing customer service

Where do Virtual Assistants work?

You will be doing almost all of your work indoors, and of course it will be done remotely. This means you’ll need to have reliable access to a computer and a stable internet connection. On the plus side, you can do your work from nearly anywhere – including your home, your favourite café, or the library.

What kind of lifestyle can I expect as a Virtual Assistant?

Part-time and casual work is very common for Virtual Assistants, giving you lots flexibility in how you structure your day. You’ll most likely be working normal business hours (usually 9 to 5), but if you’re an early bird or night owl, you might even be able to negotiate your own hours.

Most Virtual Assistants can expect to earn an average salary throughout their career.

Demand for Virtual Assistants is growing, as small businesses and entrepreneurs often look to more cost-effective services than retaining on-site employees, and advances in technology make remote work easier and more effective.

How to become a Virtual Assistant

There are no formal requirements for becoming a VA, but finishing high school and completing other training or qualifications may help you get a foot in the door more easily.

Step 1 – Study English, Maths, and IT at high school.

Step 2 – Consider undertaking a traineeship or obtaining a relevant qualification, such as in business, IT, or even design.

Step 3 – Find work experience in an office environment.

Step 4 – Ensure you have all the necessary equipment and a comfortable working space. This might include a computer or tablet, internet connection, mobile phone, headset, video camera, and any mandatory software.

Step 5 – Start networking. This will help you make contacts, find clients, or even build up a database of service providers you can call on if you need their skills.

Find out more here:

Similar Careers to Virtual Assistant

  • Administrative Assistant
  • Social Media Manager
  • Personal/Executive Assistant
  • Office Manager
  • Entrepreneur
  • Small Business Owner
  • Marketing Assistant
  • Bookkeeper

Find out more about alternative careers.

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